no longer silenced movement

Empowering Child Abuse Survivors and Promoting Awareness

Tag: strength

If You Ever Need Someone To Talk To

Since it’s a Friday night, I’m going to keep this short and sweet. If you ever need somebody to talk to, never feel bad about reaching out. We’re here to support you. We’re here to help you. No matter who you are. No matter what you’re going through, don’t ever think you’re alone.

No tragedy is the same, no bad childhood can be compared, and nobody can really say they understand your depression and anxiety exactly as is…while all that is true, we still can support each other. We can lend a listening ear, when it feels like you’re world is falling apart. When you feel so unloved, getting out of bed is too difficult to bear, read some posts and remind yourself, that there are people out there…people you’ve never met, who want you to know how special you are, and how much you are not alone, even though it may feel that way.

You get this life, and you’re handed a deck of cards, and sometimes, no matter how great of a person you are, you’re deck can and will royally suck…and what’s worse is the people who put themselves above all will get the most incredible and unfair deck, and it will make you feel worse, it’ll make you want to give up…but that’s when you need to try harder. No matter what you’re experiencing, I promise, there’s somebody out there that understands how you feel. Don’t give up on yourself. never ever give up on yourself.

Regardless of how you feel in this moment, remember all of this, and make your life the most beautiful comeback story anyone has ever seen.

Emotions Behind Abuse

When asked how she felt right before she left her abuser on http://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/verbalabuseinrelationships/2013/03/quotes-on-abuse-from-survivors/ ….”Guilt, relief, and pity. I told myself there was nothing else I could do for him, because he would either kill me or I’d kill myself before I even graduated high school.” ~Alexandra

People who look at abuse on the outside, can’t understand how people endure it for so long. They can’t understand why victims feel guilt, about the world gaining knowledge that someone they loved and looked up to, is an abuser. The world is not black and white, and abuse is not so simple. Outsiders might see it as weakness, but I assure you, it’s not.

The reason a victim feels the way they do comes from a number of things, but they have a much better understanding on what goes on in the human mind than you think. They understand concepts you have to experience to even consider. They see their abuser, and they realize, there’s something wrong with them, and they need help. More times than not, an abuser has been abused themselves, and the vicious cycle grows and continue to mark an ugly family tradition.

It’s not to make an excuse for their abuser, or any abuser…in life we all have experiences that lead us to decisions, and no matter what it is that happened to us, we make that decision, and will be the ones to face the consequences of that decision. To be clear, I’m not writing this in the hopes that an outsider will understand, though I wish they would…I’m instead, writing this for any and all victims of abuse. If you’ve ever felt pathetic or weak based on society’s opinion, I’m here to tell you, you’re not. Never for a second, forget that you’re anything but strong and courageous, and people around the World do understand you. You’re never alone in this.

Wear Tragedies Like Armor

work hard     While everybody has experienced at least one form of tragedy, none of us experience the same tragedy. Everyone who was abused as a child has their own story, feels their own way, copes their own way, and experiences pain in their own way.

Your story can seem so similar to the person next to you, and you can tell them you understand, but unless you’re them, you can’t assume you understand exactly what it is that they’re going through.

One thing, every child abuse survivor shares, is the need to cope, the need to not just survive, but the ability to thrive. You cannot get back the childhood that’s robbed from you, that every survivor shares too, but you can live your life in such a way, that you love it enough to make up for it. Whatever you wanted to do as a child, a sport, play an instrument, get singing lessons, dance, learn to cook or sew…all of that you can still do, and you will have yourself to thank for it. If you use your pain as motivation, and go after the dream career you want, and experience all of the hobbies that so many kids are blessed to have, you’ll feel a sense of fulfillment and love for yourself, that is so much greater than your pain. Passion is powerful, and there’s nothing it can’t change. If you can survive abuse, there’s nothing you can’t do, no age that’s too old, and no difficult task that you can’t accomplish.

You do have, within you, the ability to overcome anything, and just because you were unable to experience something in your youth, doesn’t mean you don’t deserve that chance now. Try all of the hobbies you’ve ever wanted to try, and go after your dream job like you need it as bad as food and water. Never let your past weigh you down, the darker your past, the stronger you are, and the greater the person that you’re capable of being.

Child Abuse Cas…

Child Abuse Casts a shadow that lasts a lifetime.

-Herbert Ward

Traumatic experiences can often lead to negative outcomes, and when emotional pain is unbearable, it’s difficult to not give up on yourself and the beautiful life you deserve. There’s a way to come out positive, to remember what you deserve, and to prove everyone wrong that ever put you down. Disadvantaged youth from child abuse that remain positive are said to be Resiliant. Resilience is said to be caused from intelligence, positive influences, a big sense of humor, and the capability to be independent. Never let the odds being against you make you give up, prove yourself and the World wrong and there’s no measure in what a disadvantaged youth can become. It’s incredible to survive a life with so much struggle, and flourish in the difficulty.

***Research from childwelfare.gov