No Socioeconomic Boundaries

by No Longer Silenced Movement

I recently wrote on my personal blog and will elaborate here, some things, like emotional disorders, have no socioeconomic boundaries…like Child Abuse, you cannot look at the stats of the quality of someone’s life and conclude whether they struggle and face either of these problems.

As shown in the statistics provided by Childhelp.org, we can conclude that the amount of child abuse survivors facing mental illness is exponentially high compared with most young adults of the same age. The major misconception with mental illness is that we feel someone who is struggling a particular day can tell you exactly what’s wrong, so you can try to fix it, some days your depression and/or anxiety get the best of you and you have no idea why. You hate that woke up, you don’t want to move from bed, you can’t imagine studying, or showing your face at work, you feel numb all over, and a type of cold loneliness, even with someone who loves you unconditionally…today you’ve convinced yourself they don’t…and the worst part of it all, is that you have no idea how to fix it or if you can. The pain can get so bad that is physically hurts to be awake, or sober in a sense, but even when the only thing in the world that you want to do is sleep, you lay there and cry, until you’ve emotionally and physically exhausted yourself to sleep for at least twenty minutes.

It’s not pretty, it’s certainly somebody dealing with the disorders would choose if they had a choice at all, but unfortunately, mental illness is not a choice. It has been romanticized and molded into this thing others assume people decide to pick up one day, like a hobby…but if you truly face these, you probably dream you could wish it away. Mental disorders are a constant battle, so I’m asking you this…if you love somebody who faces these diseases, don’t expect them to give you an outright answer, don’t expect them to go out of their way to talk to you, don’t assume a smile on their face represents a smile in their heart…but be there for them, ask them if they want to talk about it, if not, do what they’d like to do to help themselves. Always encourage therapy, nothing compares to professional help. Go for a walk with them, volunteer at a humane society with them once a week, have an arts and crafts night…anything that you believe will help their well-being, do it, and you’ll be forever grateful you made that decision.

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